Archive for October, 2012

October 18, 2012

Spectacles, Kristin Krimmel, 36 x 36 inches. Acrylic on Canvas

The show is just about over. I’ve had great feed back. Clearly the favorite painting is “Spectacles”, three panels forming a 36 x 36 inch triptych. Next comes “Hallelulia!” amd then the renamed painting “Grow Op”.

Hallelulia!  Kristin Krimmel, 2 panels creating a 36 x 36 image, acrylic on canvas.

There’s a story to tell here.

I did the larger 24×36 inches portion and it always seemed not quite complete. I kept thinking that it looked like a musical score with the cables curling along like musical clefs, and the wires like the staff one writes music on. My piano music was not giving me quite the image I wanted so I asked my friend Karen who taught Voice lessons and choral music. She brought me a beautiful collection of Handel’s works for voice which included the Hallelulia Chorus in it. What you see on the second panel to the right is the first chords of the Hallelulia Chorus.

When next she saw the painting, I had created the second part enought for her to see the structure of it. “Why,” she asked, “had I made the bass clef like that?” It was pointed in the wrong direction and had an extra curl to it, making it look more like a snail shell than an ear.

I pointed out to her that I had copied it directly from the music she had given me. So she went home to research that symbol that she had not noticed before in her musical career.  It turns out that it is called a C-clef and the dot rests on a line that then becomes C. It was an old way of writing music that has generally speaking become obsolete.

“Grow Op”  Kristin Krimmel, 24 x 3 6 inches acrylic on canvas

I originally called this one Distribution: Tangle and Shadow.
I was in the sign shop picking up my vinyl lettering for the gallery opening. I always talk to Pat, the graphic designer, because he, too, is an artist, although of quite different style and intent. I was explaining the upcoming exhibition and mentioned that it was all about Power Poles.  The older fellow at the till piped up “I’d like to see that!” so I encouraged him to look at my web site on line. It only took a few seconds before he was howling with laughter.

“What’s so funny?” I asked as his laughter subsided. “What are you looking at?”

He turned around the computer and pointed to this painting and said, “I worked for Telus for years. I trained the electricians to look out for this type of wiring – he pointed to the scrawny brown wires coming down the centre of the picture.An electrician could electrocute himself on a set up like this if he didn’t pay attention to it. Do you know where this is?”

“I don’t have a clue. I’ve been taking photos for over 10 years on this subject.  I’ve no idea where it is.”

At the opening of the exhibition, everyone loved the story of this painting, so now it’s  renamed “Grow Op.”

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Love, Decay and Repair

October 7, 2012

At the far end of the gallery, in direct line from the entry, are three large hooked hangings inspired by hosta leaves. They engage the entire wall with their soft new-green colour, six feet high, 27 inches wide each. They belong to each other, like triplets . Not that each is identical, but the colours and the method of working are the same; and together they describe a greater whole than the parts individually do.

These are called rugs, but I would hate to see such fine, detailed workmanship put on the floor to be walked on. Each is composed of strips of fabric cut into narrow strips which are hooked into the linen base from below, surfacing on “the right side” as loops no higher than 3/4 of an inch. By the way they are pulled up from underneath, they can be twisted or organized to lie parallel to each other or in circular patterns and this creates tactile passages of great visual interest. The attention to such  detail is what makes these large works sing.

Michelle Sirois-Silver is the artist and this is her Hosta Series number 2.  In this series, the plants are alive and well, unlike her Hosta Series 3 where Sirois-Silver explores the decay of the plant as it comes to maturity and then returns to the earth. In Series 3, the colours change to autumn rich rusts, soft tans and reds with deep  blue shadows; then just as the plant collapses into more muted colours, the soft beiges and browns like dry earth that it is about to join in the birth-life-death cycle.

Sirois-Silver says, “Love Decay Repair reflects my philosophy about art and craft and the seamless integration of traditional and contemporary design, techniques, practice and attitues. Applying and integrating unexpected materials and techniquies into hand hooked work has always intrigued me. In the “decay” pieces, the surface of the leaf begins to disintegrate, taking on a vulnerable quality. The colours are dull and muted. Tears and cracks begin to appear on the surface and new materials and layered techniques such as hand stitching, needle felt and machine stitching are used to depict aspects of decay and repair.”

I like to look at art work without reference to the artist’s intent and explanation. It allows me to feel, instead of analyzing. It helps me integrate the whole rather than to deconstruct. Having said that, I declare my deep interest in the constructive or creative process that is involved in making art. It is for this reason that, of all the works on display, I was spell-bound by the documentation that was tucked on a plinth beside the gallery attendant’s desk.

 

In two books, journals really,  Sirois-Silver collected her lively samples of colours, her explorations of composition, texture and tone. There is page after page of sketches with variations on her theme. There is an awesome display of creativity. .

The drawings are fresh. The ideas are recorded not only in pen, pencil and paint but in swatches of fabric, trial bits of hooking, buttons, fabric, threads and yarns.. You can see some of her visual art process. This, I think, is absolutely wonderful.Imperfect. Living.  Engaging.

I was very thankful to see these, precursors to the fine work that she has conceived into perfect, flawless wall hangings.

These are still on display until October 13, 2012, so if you have a chance come to see them, or look for her news on her web site:

http://www.michellesirois-silver.com/

power and connection

October 6, 2012

We pass them by, not even thinking of their significance to our lives. As we photograph, we curse the way they traverse a perfect landscape or clutter our alleyways. Yet the pole and their wires bring us light, telephone, electronic information and mechanization.

They are a metaphor for connectivity and for communication.

I chose to look at them for what they are. I chose to put them in the picture instead of taking them out.

All Paintings in this exhibition are by Kristin Krimmel. They are works in acrylic paint on canvas.

In each painting, I discover things that I did not know. For instance the wires that I thought were all black are in fact varied in colours of white, red, turquoise blue and black. There are ceramic insulators that are a deep burgundy colour and others that are white. Some are glass, in transparent aquamarine. There are more ways to connect and more ways for a line to travel than I had ever suspected.

 

I see that a single wire bending and twisting in the light can change colour just because of  the light source and the shadows which occur.

 

This series is about observation and finding  in the common objects around us. Every painting is a discovery.

This exhibition of all new acrylic paintings by Kristin Krimmel is currently underway at the Fort Gallery at 9048 Glover Road in Fort Langley, B.C.  It runs  October 3 to 21, 2012.